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Thursday, September 29

  1. page Trends edited ... Using New Forms of Technology to Enhance Accessibility to Library Services and Resources paul…
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    Using New Forms of Technology to Enhance Accessibility to Library Services and Resources
    paul.signorelli Apr 1, 2015The use of assistive technology as a way of fostering access to library services and resources among those with disabilities is hardly new, but the possibility of adapting newer forms of technology (e.g., wearable technology 3D printing, and mobile devices) into the assistive technology landscape seems to be in the early stages of development. Noting it here and exploring it further in the "Key Challenges" section of the 2015 Library Edition wiki as a potentially new "difficult challenge." Jacqueline.Fritz Apr 16, 2015 Agreed! dianeb Apr 17, 2015 Me too! mylee.joseph Apr 19, 2015
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    sharing, Kevin.
    Assistive Technology to Foster Accessibility to Library Services and Resources paul.signorelli Apr 1, 2015Creating access to library services and resources for those with disabilities is hardly a new topic; the American Library Association's ASCLA (Association of Specialized and Cooperative Library Agencies) division is among those offering guidance through its "Library Accessibility -- What You Need to Know" page (http://www.ala.org/ascla/asclaprotools/accessibilitytipsheets) and the link to its "Assistive Technology" tip sheet (http://www.ala.org/ascla/sites/ala.org.ascla/files/content/asclaprotools/accessibilitytipsheets/tipsheets/11-Assistive_Technol.pdf). A library colleague's recent comment about the difference between what libraries strive to offer in this area and what library users' experiences with the technology actually are raises an interesting question: are we effectively using assistive technology to create the highest levels of access possible? Glancing at an online description for an assistive technology workshop scheduled for April 8, 2015 through the Pacer Center (http://www.pacer.org/about/) suggests there are plenty of options to be explored here, e.g., "wearable technology, 3D printing, mobile devices, and more -- and their potential to help children [and other learners] with disabilities and learning differences" (http://www.pacer.org/forms/workshops.asp?wksp=504906B3-FFEA-4249-A6BD-EF8ED48B3F63). Might be interesting to see what other members of the Library Edition panel of experts are seeing within their own libraries and whether they agree that this is a difficult challenge in the sense that much more could be done to make library services and resources available through more creative and widespread use of assistive technology.
    kevin-johnson Apr 9, 2015 I also think Paul's reminder here is warranted - we need to consider this minority; it should be our democratic duty.- I agree! and I refer to the topic accessiblity of online resources - a field on which still a lot of work has to be done. There are formats like EPUB3 that give many options but still only few e-books are really accessible. rudolf.mumenthaler Apr 16, 2015 While not a new topic, it's a topic with new life. On our campus we formed the "ADA Technology Compliance Working Group" in late 2011 in response to these two letters: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/letters/colleague-20100629.pdf, http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ocr/docs/dcl-ebook-faq-201105.pdf. Discussions included point of need vs. new standards for providing more accessible resources as part of regular workflows. Our group developed a Technology Accessibility Plan that was submitted to our administration in late 2012. This was a HUGH cross-campus effort that included a number of people from the libraries (including myself). Accessing Higher Ground is a great resource for this topic(http://accessinghigherground.org/). Their focus is "Accessible media, Universal Design and Assistive Technology in the university, business and public setting; Legal and policy issues, including ADA and 508 compliance; The creation of accessible media and information resources, including Web pages and library resources." Here's an example of the workshop options being offered on our campus for accessibility (this is not a library effort). lcshedd Apr 16, 2015. I agree that this is an important topic and not just for the library community but the entire campus. Regardless of how small the community might be on your campus, we have an obligation to make resources and services accessible to all. Our library has an Assistive Technology group that works on these issues all the time with guidance from our Disability Services department. We have a link on our website to talk about the services we offer. As the person responsible for our website and all the technology in the library, I make sure that our products are accessible to all. dianeb Apr 18, 2015 [Editor's Note: This reads like a trend and the discussions here will be moved to RQ3.]
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  3. page Smart Objects edited ... What are Smart Objects? [[include component="page" page="TopicsNav"]] .…
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    What are Smart Objects?
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